[free] The Rise and Fall of the Brown Buffalo // SF

¡Murales Rebeldes! Film Series:
The Rise and Fall of the Brown Buffalo
Tuesday, June 5, 2018, 6 PM
California Historical Society,
678 Mission Street, San Francisco.

The Rise and Fall of the Brown Buffalo is a fresh and genre-defying film about the life of radical Chicano lawyer, author and counter-cultural icon, Oscar Zeta Acosta—the basis for the character Dr. Gonzo in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, written by his friend, legendary journalist-provocateur Hunter S. Thompson.

See trailer!

 

Get free tickets!

Use Promo Code Mexican Museum to get Free Admission to this CHS film. Promotion is limited to two tickets per guest.

Director Phillip Rodriguez will join us to answer questions about the film.

In partnership with California Historical Society.

 

About the Film:

The author of two groundbreaking autobiographical novels, The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo and The Revolt of the Cockroach People Acosta’s powerful literary voice, brash courtroom style and notorious revolutionary antics made him a revered figure within the Chicano movement of the 1960s and 70s and offered one of the most brazen assaults on the status quo and white supremacy seen at the time. Yet Acosta is more known for his turn as Thompson’s bumbling sidekick in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas than for his own work exposing racial bias, hypocrisy and repression within the California justice system.

Channeling the spirit of the psychedelic 60s and the joyful irreverence of “Gonzo” journalism, The Rise and Fall of the Brown Buffalo shows Acosta’s personal and creative evolution playing out against the backdrop of a society in turmoil. From his origins in segregated rural California, to his stint as a Baptist missionary in the jungles of Panama, to his radicalization in the Chicano movement of the late 60s, and finally to his mysterious disappearance off the coast of Mexico in 1974, director Rodriguez offers a vision of a complex figure at once wholly unique, and emblematic of a generation.

Relevant now more than ever, The Rise and Fall of the Brown Buffalo explores issues of racial identity, criminal justice, politics and media representation, while revealing the personal story of a troubled but brilliant man coming to terms with his identity and finding meaning in the struggles of his people.

To learn more, visit PhillipRodriguez.co.

 

About the Filmmaker:

Phillip Rodriguez (Director/Producer/Writer) is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and veteran content provider for PBS. His films bring to light the complexities of Latino culture, history, and identity at a time when our nation’s demographics reflect unprecedented growth in the Latino community and the concomitant demand for relevant storytelling.

Rodriguez’s investigative documentary Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle explores the life and mysterious death of the pioneering journalist and won Best Documentary at the 2014 San Antonio CineFestival and the 2014 Denver XicanIndie Festival. RACE 2012: A Conversation About Race and Politics in America was awarded a 2013 CINE Golden Eagle Award in the Best Televised News Division – Informational/Current Issue category. Latinos ’08 received a 2009 CINE Golden Eagle Award for Best News Analysis. Brown is the New Green: George Lopez and the American Dream was awarded the 2008 Imagen Award for Best TV Documentary. Rodriguez’s other critically acclaimed films include Los Angeles Now, Mixed Feelings: San Diego/Tijuana, Manuel Ocampo: God is My Copilot, and Pancho Villa & Other Stories. In 2006, Rodriguez received the first annual United States Artists Broad Fellow Award. This annual award honors the country’s most accomplished and innovative artists. A graduate of U.C. Berkeley, he has an M.A. in Latin American Studies (Honors) and an M.F.A. in Film and Television from UCLA. His fellowships have included Senior Fellow at The Dorothy Leavy Center for the Study of Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University, Fellow for Documentary Filmmaking at the Institute for Justice and Journalism at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, and Senior Fellow at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Information on the Film:

  • Watch the trailer for the film here
  • Visit the film’s website here
  • The film is 57 minutes

In partnership with The Mexican Museum

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