Latinos grew in 7 of 9 Bay Area counties, soars in California

Hispanic, Latino population grows in 7 of 9 Bay Area counties, soars in California

The Hispanic and Latino population is now the largest racial and ethnic group in the state.

The 2020 Census results are in. The Hispanic and Latino population is now the largest racial and ethnic group in the state of California — with more than one in three Californians identifying as part of that group.

This is the first time the Hispanic and Latino population is the largest racial and ethnic group in the state. About 39.4% of the Golden State’s population put down that identifier when filling out the Census.

When comparing 2010 and 2020 census numbers, Vallejo had one of the largest increases for a Bay Area city, adding nearly 7,000 more Hispanic and Latino people in 10 years for a 6% increase.

In the East Bay, Richmond and Antioch saw significant increases in the number of residents identifying as Hispanic or Latino — averaging around a 5% jump.

 

Bay Area Census population changes per county: GRAPH:

* see interactive graph here.

[image].

 

Solano and Sonoma counties saw the largest gains at more than 4% each.

Contra Costa, Marin, and Napa join Solano and Sonoma Counties with a faster growing Hispanic and Latino population than the state average of 1.8%. The three counties all saw a moderate increase in that community, between 2.5% and 3%.

San Francisco and Alameda Counties saw a small Hispanic and Latino population shift with a less than 1% increase. (It’s important to note San Francisco and Alameda Counties are more populated than the North Bay counties.

HOWEVER, in the Peninsula and in the South Bay, San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties both saw a decrease in the population identifying as Hispanic or Latino.

In Santa Clara county, there were nearly 3% fewer people identifying as Hispanic or Latino in 2020 compared to 2010. But this community still makes up one in four people in the county, which is the most populated out of the nine in the Bay Area.

The Asian population grew in all local counties.

Meanwhile, the Black population declined in eight out of nine counties, and the white population decreased in every county. Experts predict we could see a continuation of these racial and ethnic trends in the Bay Area and across the state by the time the next census survey rolls around in 2030.